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RSL vs. Sporting KC: Three big questions remaining after 0-0 draw

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Our questions are more about the second half of the season than one match.

MLS: Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake Jeff Swinger-USA TODAY Sports

Will Real Salt Lake make the playoffs?

Here’s hoping, right? A draw or a win against Seattle would knock Seattle out of surprise playoff contention, and while other results around the league could see us in despite a loss, let’s just say it doesn’t seem particularly sunny out here in Salt Lake County.

Can Real Salt Lake score more than a goal per game in the second half of 2016?

Real Salt Lake’s forwards, simply put, haven’t been scoring in buckets. Since July 1 — matchday 17 — they’ve scored a combined 10 goals.

  • Yura Movsisyan: Three goals, three assists since July 1
  • Joao Plata: Four goals, five assists since July 1
  • Juan Manuel Martinez: Two goals, one assist since July 1
  • Olmes Garcia: One goal, one assist since July 1 (also, all season)
  • Jordan Allen: None since July 1 — although he’s played as a forward, midfielder and defender in that time.

Non-forwards have scored just slightly fewer with six.

Non-forwards

  • Javier Morales: Three goals, four assists
  • Justen Glad: One goal
  • Jamison Olave: One goal
  • Luke Mulholland: One goal

With one more goal — one! — they could average a single game scored per game in the second half of the season. No, that’s not particularly good. It doesn’t necessarily bode well for any potential playoff run. Whatever the cause, it needs fixing.

Who should be scoring goals?

It’s easy to point at the forwards and shout about how they haven’t scored enough this season. That’s a valid position to take, and I can’t argue that — but with four goals coming from the midfield in the second half of the season, and not too many coming before that, either, it’s increasingly clear that there’s a goalscoring problem.

So, who?

Everyone. The only solution is to have more consistent goalscoring across the team. When one important player drops off in production, other players need to be ready and able to step in. That’s not something we’ve seen much of.